1998 on the Web Home Technology Diary 1998 Predictions Tips and Tools Awards to Win Your Comments  


1998 Technology Diary



  October 1998  

Scroll down to view entire week. Use navigation bar below to go forward or back.

______________________________ 

Sunday, October 18  
______________________________
 

BEGINNING OF THE END FOR MICROSOFT?
Tomorrow begins what some are calling the high-technology trial of the century. The United States Department of Justice begins its anti-trust case against Microsoft Corporation over monopolistic business practices and alleged efforts to corner the Internet browser market. This trial will undoubtably be front page news for the forseeable future. 1998 on the Web invites you to stay abreast of all the daily activities by keeping your browser tuned right here. Meanwhile, take a look at what each of the major technology news zines have planned for their coverage.

After many months of legal grandstanding by both sides, Microsoft faces the music in the landmark antitrust suit filed against it by the Justice Department and attorneys general from 20 states. c|net's News.com site.

No more delays -- Justice and Microsoft finally face off in their antitrust battle, starting Monday. Everything you need to know about the trial's players and a time line of the case. CMPNet's Techweb site.

The seminal event of the Information Age will be the showdown between superpowers: Microsoft and the US DOJ. ZDNet's ZDNN site.

Thought for the day: "Microsoft's actions have stifled competition." - Atty. Gen. Janet Reno

 

______________________________ 

Saturday, October 17  
______________________________
 

NEW DHTML DEMO
Microsoft's Internet Explorer 4 browser introduced show time effects to the transitioning between one Web page and another. Much like the open and closing swipes and blends you see on television at scene switch, dynamic HTML provides a method to accomplish the same on the Web. I have put together a sampler package to demonstrate the use of DHTML page transitions and a tool for including them on your pages.
Check it out.

MYSTERY GUEST, SIGN IN PLEASE
Internet users trying to send email to America Online users or get to the online giant's site have been plagued by problems due to a major glitch with the Internet's domain naming system. Full story here.

CUARTANGO FIX RELEASED
Microsoft has issued a patch for a security hole in its Internet Explorer Web browser that exposes users' files to hostile Web site operators and email senders through JavaScript forms. More info here.

ONE DOWN, ANOTHER FOUND
Another security glitch on Lotus Development's Domino Web server may make it possible to view sensitive credit card, address, and phone data from the Web. The breach was reported last week by L0pht Heavy Industries, a group dedicated to identifying software bugs.
Details here.

Thought for the day: "The trouble with being punctual is that nobody's there to appreciate it." - Franklin P. Jones

 

______________________________ 

Thursday, October 15  
______________________________
 

THIS IS GETTING WORRISOME
Cisco is alerting customers to a bug that could reveal passwords and other information stored on network switches and routers. Add this to Microsoft's and Netscape's problems with their browser security, and we're in cracker heaven.
Full story here.

NETSCAPE COMMUNICATOR 4.5 TO BE RELEASED OCT. 19
Some of the chief improvements include built-in support for various multimedia capabilities, including RealPlayer 5.0 from RealNetworks; Headspace Beatnik, which lets users hear music and other audio feeds; and Macromedia Flash, which lets users view animation, technical illustrations, and other complex media. More info here.

CABLE HOT, SO FAR
In the race to connect homes to the Internet at super-fast speeds, the cable industry is pulling far ahead of telephone carriers, but a major regulatory battle is brewing that could shake up the field. Details here.

Thought for the day: "The backbone of surprise is fusing speed with secrecy." - Von Clausewitz

 

______________________________ 

Wednesday, October 14  
______________________________
 

I ADMIT, I WAS WRONG!
Apple Computer said today it posted $106 million in profits on $1.56 billion in revenue for the fourth fiscal quarter, beating analysts' estimates and finishing its first profitable year since 1995. Analysts said Apple's ability to turn over its inventory and keep costs down contributed to the better-than-expected results. Full story here. With this positive news, Apple officially made one of my predictions for 1998 wrong. Congratulations are in order for Apple Computer and its interim CEO, Steve Jobs.

AND THE 2ND PART OF THAT PREDICTION?
Despite the prospect that Apple may provide evidence the U. S. government will use against the computer maker's most crucial ally, Microsoft Corp., analysts don't appear concerned that the companies' relationship is in jeopardy. For one thing, so-called coopetition, where companies both cooperate with and compete against each other, is common in the computer industry. Get the details here.

TO COMPLETE APPLE'S BIG DAY
They
officially introduced an upgraded version of the Macintosh operating system, Mac OS 8.5. Apple is banking on having a large number of users migrate to the OS because of its enhanced performance and improved ease of installation. Learn what else it has here.

Thought for the day: "I told him, 'Steve, I'll never be as charismatic as you are, and you'll never be as good of an operating manager as I am. You can't run a corporation ... by just being cool.'" - Former Apple CEO Gil Amelio

 

______________________________ 

Monday, October 12  
______________________________
 

CAN YOU SAY "ADD TO FAVORITES"?
A "phone browser" prototype developed jointly by Spyglass and Lucent allows navigation between Web pages using voice commands given over a telephone.
More info here.

INTERNET COPYRIGHT
A bill approved by the U.S. House of Representatives Monday is designed to integrate the provisions of two international treaties -- including criminal penalties for pirating work -- adopted by the World Intellectual Property Organization in 1996. It is expected to be signed into law by President Clinton. Full story here.

SON OF CACHE COW
Finding bugs in Netscape Navigator has become almost a full time job for Dan Brumleve, a Sunnyvale, Calif., computer consultant. This time, he’s found a bug that allows Webmasters to pull cookies off visitors’ hard drives. Details here.

Thought for the day: "Don't worry about the world coming to an end today. It's already tomorrow in Australia." - Charles Shultz

 

  Home Predictions Tips and Tools Beginning of Diary Previous Month Previous Week Top of Diary Bottom of Diary Next Week Next Month End of Diary

 

Search the Helpware Member Directory


   E-mail the Author    View WebTracker Statistics

Copyright 1997, 1998 Internet Brothers. All Rights Reserved.